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THE RISE AND FALL OF THE PROPERTY- OWNING DEMOCRACY IN ENGLAND


1 min read
15 Nov

FULL TEXT

THE RISE AND FALL OF THE PROPERTY-OWNING DEMOCRACY PDF 22.pdf

Owner-occupation in England increased from about 22% in 1920 to 69.6% in 2002 but declined to 62.9% in 2016/17 although there are signs that homeownership is now on the increase. This post traces the rise and fall of the ‘property owning democracy’ focusing on:

  • The links between the ‘property owning democracy’ and suburbia;
  • The ways that the owner-occupation was boosted by the decline of private landlordism and how the fall in homeownership has been accelerated by the private renting revival;
  • The Right to Buy impact;
  • The contentious claim made by Mulheirn in Tackling the UK housing crisis: is supply the answer?(2019) that the housing crisis is unrelated to new housing supply;
  • How the age variable in homeownership reduction is permeated by class, gender, migration, ethnicity and place;
  • The political connections between the planning system and the demise of the ‘property owning democracy’.

The article concludes by examining ways to revive the ‘property owning democracy’ can  be revived.




THE RISE AND FALL OF THE PROPERTY-OWNING DEMOCRACY PDF 22.pdf